From the Consultant Files: Make That First Impression Count

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We all know that phrase, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” Trite as it may sound, it’s also true. I put the shoe on the other foot (to borrow another cliché) and recently interviewed vendors for my website redesign. It was a stark reminder of how important that first meeting is. Here’s what I learned.

Do Your Homework

When I interview for a gig, I prep: research the position, company, potential client, you get the idea. One of the vendors I spoke with seemed to have no clue about the project (even though I emailed her about it in advance). Worse yet, I had to spell out my website address, which is my name. Don’t be that vendor. I’ve learned everything I need to know before we (don’t) go any further. Being unprepared reflects poorly— either you’re not interested, too busy, disorganized, or all of the above. Harsh? Yes, but goes back to that first impression.

Go Easy on the Critique 

That first call with a potential client always walks a tightrope: You want to show your value, but too much feedback or criticism can backfire. For instance, when the gig is to rewrite website copy, I don’t trash the current site since the person I’m speaking with may have approved it, or worse yet, wrote the copy. I let the client lead the conversation. One vendor suggested I get rid of my blog, even though I told her it was part of my marketing strategy. Another commented that it was a “red flag” when I told her I was busy and might be delayed in getting back to her sometimes. (Ironically my red flag was  her saying that.)

Gig First, Money Second

No consultant wants to waste time on a job that is not in his or her price range, including yours truly. But it’s not the first question that I ask about a contract. Sure, it’s in the top three but we’ll get to the money soon enough. One email exchange with a vendor ended the job before it even started when he relayed his minimum project amount (which was over my threshold). It reminds me of that famous quote from former supermodel Linda Evangelista back in the ’80s: “I don’t wake up for less than $10,000 a day.” It’s not always wise to reject a gig outright before you have all the info. What if this work leads to bigger and better projects? Or I can introduce you to others that can hire you? Don’t close a door before you know what’s behind it.

Follow Up the Right Amount

We’ve all been there, even for a 9-5 job: You have that first call, everything goes great, and now you have to gauge when to check back in. You want to show that you’re interested but not appear desperate. There are no hard and fast rules, but do something (unless you don’t want the work). Several vendors followed up at the right cadence; one even sent me ideas for potential design directions. Another vendor’s proposal didn’t come through due to an internet service glitch, which I only found out by contacting her. On the flip side, there can be toooo much communication. One vendor asked me to fill out a lengthy questionnaire before our call, even though I told her we were having an intro chat (she then shrunk the meeting invite to a measly 15 minutes). Unsurprisingly, that didn’t go over well.

Chemistry Matters

Like most relationships, that first call is a microcosm of what’s to come in the future. Did you have a natural back and forth, or was it awkward and stilted? Did the person ask the right questions? Did you have anything in common? While being chummy is not a requirement to work together, a decent rapport and good communication are. You’ll be collaborating closely, so pay attention to how you relate to one another. Building a client relationship isn’t just about your expertise, it’s also the interpersonal dynamics. Both matter and are part of the hiring package.

Treat Referrals with Care

When someone gives me a referral, I am not only grateful, but well aware I have an inside track to getting the contract over some random vendor. But it’s also not a guarantee I get the gig either. I still have to put in the work to show you’re the best fit for the job. Of the referrals for my project, some weren’t right fit, which is to be expected. That’s why I extended the same respect to the them that I would want when I don’t get a job. After I made my decision, I notified the candidates and thanked them for their proposals. We all put time and energy into landing a gig, so don’t leave vendors hanging.

In the end, I followed my gut from first impressions: I chose someone that I thought had the right mix of skills, clearly wanted the work, came with good references, and seemed reliable. Hopefully my next blog post won’t be another cliché: “Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover” 😆

photo credit: Frabz.com

 

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Five Questions for the Freelancer

Becoming-a-Freelance-Article-Writer-1170x731It’s National Small Business Week! That got me thinking about the friends, colleagues, and random folks who ask me questions about running a freelance biz. So here they are, in no particular order.

Is it hard to start a business?

Yes and no. You can make it as easy or complicated as you want. If it’s just you and you’re working out of your home office, it’s pretty straightforward.  If you’re going to be setting up a remote office, doing tons of promotion, etc. you’re taking on more at the get-go. But you will need to do the essentials, like a DBA (if you’re naming your business), a business license, biz cards (yes, I still have one and I use it), any necessary office equipment, a simple website, and an accounting and expenses program. I also recommend that you put aside a healthy chunk of money in the bank before go out on your own. When I started out in 1999, I cashed out stock at my prior company, which helped with startup costs and slower times. Which leads me to the second question I get.

Don’t you worry about getting business?

Fact: If you’re not concerned where you’re next job is coming from, you shouldn’t be in business for yourself. Even when I have the steadiest of gigs, jobs can end ANYTIME and sometimes do. Or last for years. Change of personnel, budget cuts, and other factors can turn on a dime. There’s always an element of risk. Some months I’ll have tons of work and leads, and others can be dry as a bone. There is also the investment of time to get a contract and it doesn’t always pan out. That’s why it’s critical to stay sharp, focused, and consistently be on the hunt for your next gig. I attend networking events, actively search on Linkedin and job lists, and put out the word to my network. It’s a constant cycle and requires a certain tolerance for risk. This is the beauty and the beast of having your own business. Embrace it or stick with 9 to 5.

How do you decide how much to charge?

That is the $64,000 question and an enigma wrapped in a quagmire. There are standard industry rates for many freelancer roles, but other factors go into deciding how much to charge. Here are some criteria I take into consideration that can push a rate up or down: Is it long-term or short-term opportunity? Is it with a cool company I want to get on my resume? Is it a startup that doesn’t have a lot of cash, through an agency, or a big corporation? Is it on a really interesting project that I’ve never done before and can use as a new type of work sample? Ultimately, I have to feel that what I’m being paid is fair, otherwise it will cause resentment on the job. Know your market worth and it will make saying yes and no a lot easier (remember to stash some cash too!).

What time do you get up? 

This is the most annoying question I get. There is this persistent image of the freelancer waking up at 10am grabbing some coffee, watching daytime talk shows or binging Netflix, and then eventually working for an hour in the afternoon. This is only on Fridays. Kidding. Truth is we don’t get paid unless we work, so there is high motivation to sit at the desk, co-working space, or couch and get sh*t done. We can make our own schedule since we know the deadlines, but many of us work strange hours, or weekends. Conversely, we’ll also have those slower times regular employees don’t. That’s when we can grocery store or run errands or schedule lunches during the day — but sorry to burst your bubble — a life of luxurious relaxation this is not.

Would you ever go back to a full-time job?

I tried that once in 19 years and not long after, I was back in the freelancer’s chair. Once I had a taste of that freedom, I didn’t want to go back. Sure it’s nice to get a regular paycheck, benefits, etc. but there’s another price to pay, and for me, it’s a lifestyle choice. I love picking and choosing the jobs that I want, meeting new and interesting clients, and learning new products. And if the the gig turns out to be a disaster, I can walk away, relatively unscathed. Of course I still do my fair share of griping about the contracting lifestyle, but in the end, I’m in the fly solo zone  — and that’s exactly where I want to stay.

What other questions do you wonder about? Freelancers: what are some of the common questions you get? What did I miss?

 

 

5 Ways to Make the Best Use of Your Freelancer’s Time (and Your Money)

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Big companies. Small companies. Startups. I’ve worked with all of them as a contract marketer and writer over the past almost two decades. They all have one thing in common: no standard way to work with freelancers.

How could they, though? There is no rule book or baseline. Based on my own experience, here are some practices I’ve learned that will always make financial sense that next time you bring in the contractor.

Start Work on Done Deals

Change happens. It’s a natural part of any project. However, some deliverables are more “dynamic” than others (See, I told you I was in marketing). If your project is in a state of flux, halt the contractor until the work is on lock down. Why waste everyone’s time and money on something that isn’t rock solid? I had a client for years that was hurry-up-and-wait on every project. I would block my time, work just a wee a bit on the project, release the time, rinse and repeat. Finally, this year, I decided 10th time’s a charm and became “too busy” for the work. Sad but true.

Don’t Use Contractors For Internal Processes

I would hazard to guess that 99% of freelancers despise administrative work (it might also be half the reason we left corporate America). Put it this way: We hate bureaucracy more than your average bear. Filling out forms, chasing people down, and working through internal systems… lots of work and little payoff for everyone involved, including whoever is tasked to explain everything to us and get us up to speed. Here’s a better idea: Assign those tasks to an employee that can do it faster and at less cost. It’s not the “not my job” thing but “doesn’t make sense” thing.

Think Before You Meet

Ask yourself this question first: Does the freelancer really need to be in on this meeting? If it’s essential for background, introductions, or a working meeting, then by all means yes. If it’s a nice-to-have or a routine team check-in that doesn’t involve our work, leave us out. Reminder: You are charged for each hour that we log. Even if it’s a project fee, put that time to good use. We could be focusing on your deliverables instead. A positive trend I’ve seen the past few years is 30-minute meetings. Corporate America has realized that when you have less time, you’re more productive and get sh*t done.

Embrace the Brain Dump

One of the biggest learning curves for freelancers is ramping up on projects with new companies. As we gain more experience, we also become more adept at figuring things out quickly. Please help us along by giving us the scoop on everything: work background, org charts, and anything else that is going to help us do the work more efficiently. Clients often say “I feel like I’m overwhelming you” in a brain dump, but we’re used to soaking up new information up like a sponge, and want it — everything will make sense later. This should also include the lowdown on politics, where to tread lightly, etc. It’s not gossip; it helps us get the job done without incident, which in the end, makes everyone look better – including you the client.

Write the Job Down

Sounds simple, but it doesn’t always happen in the rush to “get the contractor in ASAP.” No matter what the timeline is, written roles will always trump the possibility of your freelancer misunderstanding his or her priorities. Whether it’s a formal job description or an email with a bulleted list, provide some sort of document. If and when new responsibilities get piled on, the scope can be reviewed for time and budget. Last year, I was provided cryptic one-word answers to the role I was taking on, and sure enough, it ended up being a hodge-podge of tasks. That was my bad, but as contractors, we always learn new lessons, no matter how long we’ve been doing it!

On any new contract, both the client and consultant are  responsible for a successful project — but it will be the client who leads the consultant down the path in a straight line instead of falling into expensive potholes all along the way.

 

Five Smarter Ways to Start Your Next Gig

A lot of times in Hollywood you’re as good as your last job”

-Liev Schrieber

OK, we’re not in Tinseltown. But as consultants, we can all learn a valuable lesson here: the way your last gig goes can dictate your future, so kick things off on the right foot. Here are some tricks I’ve learned over the years to save you time.

Get a 360° View

multitask_253458706-thumb-380xauto-3991We know all the usual suspects before you start a new contract: look at the website, study up on materials your new client gave you, tap anyone you know that works there and get the skinny. But with so much information on the internet (not to mention other consultants chomping at the bit), you’ve got to do more. Read articles about their business, review their social media, how the competition talks, dig into their corporate culture on employee rating sites, check out their ads – in short, act like you’re starting a job as an employee.

Get the Work in Writingsamuelgoldwyn1

This would seem a no-brainer, but many consultants start contracts without a written agreement and will “do the paperwork later.” Nope. If it involves money and time, get a record of it – whether your contract or the client’s, a signed estimate, or other legally- binding document. Don’t miss the nuances of your profession either. As a writer, one of the most difficult areas to gauge is how many rounds of edits. Sometimes it’s two, others it takes a village, so I bake that into each job. Think of your own industry and the “gotchas.”

Set Communication Ground Rules
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Email. Phone. Text. Skype. Ad nauseam. Your client has preferences to keep in touch. Make sure you know what they are before you start work. They’ll appreciate that you asked. Forgo misunderstandings after you bombard him or her with emails and should have picked up the phone. For your part, if you have a commitment every Thursday afternoon from 4-6pm, let the client know before you start the gig. Also, be firm about your own preferences: years ago I had a client that called me for everything, urgent or not. Having a conversation at the beginning works wonders.

Get Dialed into Corporate Life

jpmorgan-just-relaxed-its-office-dress-code-in-a-huge-wayOne of the many reasons folks leave corporate life for freelancing is the bureaucracy – you can run but you can’t hide. Be prepared to have déjà vu when you contract for a large corporation, especially if you will be on their email system or are assigned a company computer. Then there’s the security badge and other administrative tasks. Find out what those tasks are before you start your job so you can be productive Day One.

Strut Your Stuff For Free

veryLet’s be clear: don’t spend 25 hours on complementary work. But once you have the gig, show your value-add early. Offer gratis recommendations on a project related to your assignment. Doing this can pay off now and later: it’s a perfect opportunity to be generous with your skills, and secondly, can possibly score you another assignment. Be careful not to sound critical and frame language as “opportunities.” Example: a recent website client showed me their newsletter as part of background info and I served up a list of improvements they could make. If and when they take this project on, I can potentially lead the work.

Once you check off these boxes,  it’s all about the Liev Schrieber method: do your best work and you’ll probably get that callback on the next gig.

 

The Ten Commandments of Consulting

10 commandments17 years. 50+ clients. And 10 lessons I’ve learned running my freelance communications business (sometimes I’m schooled a few times, lucky me).

Obey your contracting creed. We all have our happy work place — pay attention to it. If you’re the type that gets distracted easily and seeks quiet to concentrate, park yourself at home (like me). If you crave socialization, head to the co-working space. Though these sound like obvious choices, the almighty dollar can sway you otherwise. When I moved to San Francisco from Sunnyvale seven years ago, my frequent and long drives to clients back and forth to the south bay were making me miserable. After my inaugural year of barely-contained road rage, I committed to only taking Silicon Valley gigs that were remote or called for only a few office visits. I am clear I don’t want to spend half my time in the car. Have I lost work because of it? Absolutely, but I’m also open for contracts that fit within my lifestyle (and there is much less yelling in the car).

Fake it till you make it.  Let me explain: when I am asked if I do graphic design, the answer is always no —  that is a gift that I do not have nor claim, BUT I can recommend designers and oversee project management (always offer clients a silver lining). On the other hand, several years ago when clients asked me for social media help, I self-taught online, grilled social media experts I knew, and implemented in my own business. Point being, if clients want a new skill and you realistically can and want to add to your wheelhouse, do it. But don’t ever lie about a skill. That will come back to bite you in a painful way, not to mention you’ll make enemies fast.

Trust your gut. Like most things in life, if something doesn’t feel or smell right, it isn’t. If a client seems vague, the work has PITA written all over it, or any other reason your brain and gut are duking it out, follow the gut, it will always set you straight. Example? An ex-client (emphasis on ex-) blurted out during our interview “You’ll really dislike me and want to leave this job.” We both laughed, but she was right, I was gone a few months later. And so was the other freelance writer she hired. This is a rare occurrence, but it does happen. In the battle between head and gut, embrace the latter instead of shoulda woulda coulda thinking.

Always carry your business card.  These days, business cards are considered passé or unnecessary. But sometimes analog wins. There is nothing like a visual reminder for potential clients than your business card. One of the largest contracts I’ve had in my consulting career appeared during a mani pedi session at the local salon. The woman in the chair next to me turned out to be the director of communications for a leading Silicon Valley company – and was looking to fill a contract marcom role. Voila! A new client was born (and yes, my biz card was handy). You never know when your services will be needed for a gig. This doesn’t mean you’re always in “sales” mode, it means be ready when it happens.

Different rates for different tasks is a no-win. If a client wants an a la carte rate menu, you’ll usually end up with the short end of the financial stick. Why? This payment model is based on the premise that certain tasks are more important (and should pay more) than others. Think of it this way: no matter where you’re spending time, it’s related to the project. For me that would be research, writing, editing, or meetings — they are all interrelated in producing a great end result. The one thing you cannot get back is time, so don’t give it away – it’s your most valuable asset as a consultant.

It’s client or company bon voyage. If your client quits to go to another company, be prepared to stay with to the company or leave with that person in their next role. Also know that sometimes you’ll be out of a gig when the new client comes in with “their own people.” Prepare for all of these options at any time. You never know what’s going on behind the scenes. Cultivate good, healthy relationships around your client— a stakeholder or decision-maker surrounding them could be your next boss. One company I worked with went through three marcom directors before it was purchased, but I stuck with the firm.

Hold your work cards close. Whether you’re busy at the moment, courting other clients, or desperate for a new gig, there is no need to tell potential clients. When asked about your bandwidth, find out what the work scope is first. This is not a game or sneaky tactic, it’s just good business. And when it comes to the almighty dollar, think of yourself as a negotiation ninja — the first person who opens their mouth usually loses. That doesn’t mean you’re out to gouge clients,  but get the most financial power for your skill-set. Be reasonable in your expectations, but also be smart and never, never undersell yourself.

Say goodbye to team spirit. Truth: You are not part of the team no matter how many happy hours you attend, kudos you get on that project, or office friendships you’ve cultivated. You are not getting a regular paycheck, you are an outsider contributing to projects at a company.  You must be OK with this fact. Some freelancers get their feelings hurt along the way. I appreciate and respect the people and teams I have worked with, but the nature of consulting is impermanence. If that premise makes you uncomfortable, hit up the full-time job ads.

Set ground rules early with friends. Some consultants have a policy that they never work with friends. But if you decide to engage, it comes down to communication. I have worked with one close friend for years because we keep business and friendship separate and professional. If there was ever an issue, we put friendship first. We also benefit from a shorthand that improves project collaboration and outcomes. Conversely, I’ve worked with one friend who took advantage of the situation and didn’t put in her best effort as a sub-contractor. Unsurprisingly,  we didn’t work together again but we’re still friends. Wherever you stand on this, know the risks and rewards before you commit.

There is one word I haven’t mentioned anywhere, and one most associated with consulting: risk. This is a top reasons people don’t go into freelancing, or leave it. So here’s your last commandment (that is also one of my favorite quotes): Life begins at the end of your comfort zone. Believe it. Consulting never ceases to amaze me — the variety, the fun, the challenges. One thing is for sure, when you join the ranks of the independents, you’ll never be bored.

 

5 Tips For Working With Freelance Writers

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Ever wonder why some of freelance writing projects go smoothly and others sink like the Titanic? Peek inside our brain with some first-hand insights that will help your content hit the nail on the head – instead of the last one in the coffin.

Be a Great Partner

Collaboration is key in content development. We don’t automatically flow words together without effort. We rely on the best information to create that fabulous writing for you. We do our part by getting all the materials to the job done, including asking smart questions and confirming details. Your part? Help us close the understanding gap, like legacy knowledge or a relevant back-story, so we don’t risk missing the mark. Say, for instance, I’m the second writer you hired for this job. Why didn’t that first engagement work out? How can we improve this one?

Chart the Course

Set expectations about the project – that means the schedule, reviews, logistics, milestones and any “gotchas” along the way (um…we may add in a new product at the end). Most of these questions can be answered with a project plan – even a loose one. Schedules change but at least we’ll have a roadmap. For example, a recent website client didn’t include all the players for early reviews, so near final copy, major changes were required. That added up to wasted time, resources, and money for everyone.

No “Sh*tty First Draft”

Writer Anne Lamott aptly stated the truth about first drafts years ago and it won’t change – mark my words (sorry couldn’t resist). By the time you see our work, we’ve put a Herculean effort to make it the best it can be – but we do expect changes. It’s rare that the first time you see a document it will be “perfect” and require nary an edit. We can pine for this utopian scene but don’t expect it (that’s why it’s called Utopia, people). We are prepared to revise and get constructive criticism. Those writers who can’t deal should pick another career. Which leads us to the next tip…

Show Me, Don’t (Just) Tell Me

The way you review matters: Slap-dash or vague verbal comments will produce a sub-par result. “This paragraph doesn’t work” isn’t specific. Why? What’s the issue? If the tone of the document is off, that’s one thing, but if there are parts you want to change, be clear and note it on the document, email, or whiteboard – anything. But know that verbal feedback can sometimes be tricky to interpret. A former client would not review documents in writing as she was “too busy.” The result? A protracted review loop with misunderstandings and ad hoc changes all along the way. Bottom-line: Clarity early saves time later.

Shift Happens

Sometimes mid-way or at the very end (see “gotchas” above) someone, somewhere decides that this document needs to serve another purpose, the messaging has changed, or a response to a competitor should be weaved in (and of course deadline hasn’t changed). Hopefully, the entire document doesn’t have to be scrapped, but sometimes that’s the reality. Know that we will likely need to add to the budget and schedule if it’s not baked in. Small changes? Fine. A rewrite is a whole different animal. We’ll be fair and work with you on this, but know there is a difference between revisions and starting from scratch.

Circle-Slash Whiney Writers

Occasionally, there is a piece of content that just doesn’t work – period. Maybe the CMO jumped in and forced a paragraph that changed everything; or a success story wasn’t all that impressive; or the blog post is watered down because too many people got their hands on it. None of these situations is anyone’s “fault,” but they do need to be resolved. Moments like this can also be a breeding ground for misunderstandings and delays. Writers take a lot of pride in what they do and will help solve the issue if we can. But ultimately it will be your decision, knowing we’ve done our best work and it’s out of our hands. Though difficult, this is the life of a freelancer. The end result may not be our perfect ending, but it’s yours – and we have to accept that and walk away.

The Wrap

Freelance writing projects are an intimate exchange of partnership, jumbled words, and moving parts that can churn out a great result – or turn into a failure to launch. The best outcome? That the content serves the purpose, it will be read by your audience (and shared too!), oh, and you get well-deserved kudos. The beauty is that we can learn something from each engagement – about you, ourselves, and how to improve our writing for future projects.

Oh, and one more thing of beauty – that you’ll call me back for your next project.

Think Like Your Client and Become a Better Consultant

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Freelancers love to write about the woes of not getting paid, how they feel underappreciated, and dole out consulting advice like there’s no tomorrow. One topic we rarely explore, however, is the client point of view working with us. What do they wish we’d change? What annoys them? And what can we learn as consultants?

I know personally because I’ve been on both sides of the fence, both as a client and a freelancer. I’ve heard complaints. I’ve noted bad behaviors. I’ve been asked to change the way I operate occasionally (#trueconfessions). But to know your clients’ pet peeves is half the battle—doing something about it is quite another.

Here are some common complaints from the client trenches and ways to remedy them before they spiral out of control, or you flat out lose the work.

Don’t tell me about your other clients

The old adage “Always tell your clients you have other work” for fear of them thinking you’re desperate can also have a downside when you are actually really busy. Freelancers sometimes go too far and won’t shut up about other clients. This can take the form of blathering on about a job that is dominating your life, saying you’re strapped for time, having difficulty scheduling meetings, or worse yet, missing deadlines (more on this later). Here’s the reality: Clients don’t care much about your other jobs—they are interested in the projects you’re working on for them. Make their job your number one priority as if it were your only assignment, because in their eyes, it is. Prattling on about other non-issues also includes babysitter problems, a sinus infection, or bad dog behavior unless that’s your small talk of choice before you dig in to the work.

Do this instead: Minimize or eliminate client chatter and off-topics and focus on what’s in front of you. Mention other clients only if it’s relevant to the discussion or boosts your experience/knowledge.

Go by my communication style, not yours

In the days before “internet” was the standard lexicon, communication with clients was much easier. Fewer options meant less friction and decision making about getting your project done. Today’s technology cornucopia requires frenetic dexterity and multi-tasking: Email, text, web conference, or God forbid phone! Most clients, however, have a preferred method that will be revealed quickly. If they’re all over the map, take the initiative to ask how they want to communicate and cadence they prefer—even if you’re half-way through the project it will be worth it. I learned my lesson years ago when a client told me I was sending too many emails. That’s when we agreed to wrap up topics in one email every day. I still ask myself with every client email I write: do I send this email? Can I figure it out on my own or by asking someone else? Can it wait?

Do this instead: Make communication methods and work style a part of your project kick-off discussion with a client. Asking directly will show you are thoughtful about the work process, acknowledge their needs, and set a unified beginning to your relationship.

Meet your deadlines. Period.

I’m don’t consider myself to be a God fearin’ type but deadlines are my bible. When you don’t meet delivery dates, credibility is lost and the next job with that client could be in jeopardy. Next up, your work reputation could be at stake. Though it seems obvious that meeting deadlines would be part of a consultant’s ethos, making it top priority is what makes the difference. Sometimes milestones aren’t met due to client delays, external circumstances, or other issues beyond your control. That notwithstanding, the “Say what you mean and mean what you say” applies when it comes to deadlines.

Do this instead: Get a strong grip on deadlines with your client early on—are they loosy goosy or are they firm drop dead dates? Keep your client updated on project status so there are no surprises. Better to tell them red flags before they have to ask—by then it’s too late.

Keep payments professional

We all know step one is do the work, step two is  invoice and step three is receiving a check on your payment terms. But any consultant will tell you, that’s not always how this plays out. When working as a corporate client many moons ago, I still bristle when I think about the writer who called in advance of her invoice date and said she needed her check so she could pay her quarterly business taxes. This is not my problem as her client. Certainly companies need to pay on time (who doesn’t have stories about the late payment, including moi?). But as consultants, we also need to abide by our own terms and manage our finances properly—this is not the concern of our client.

Do this instead: Set your payment terms early on in the project and stick to them. Don’t ask to be paid early unless you have a darn good reason (i.e a portion of the project is delayed, canceled, or finishes early—this last one a rarity, of course.)

Just because I know you as a (friend, colleague, acquaintance) does not give you a work pass

Ever hire a friend for a job for it only to turn out to be a disaster? Me too. I’ve been on both sides of the fence on this one. The rule of thumb is the business relationship comes first when you’re working together, but never at the expense of the friendship. Sure you have a “short cut” to communication since you have an established relationship but that shouldn’t be an excuse for late work, overconfidence, or any other bad behavior you wouldn’t consider acceptable with a consultant you didn’t know personally. As a client years ago, I hired a friend and discovered she wasn’t up to snuff with deadlines, the quality of her work, and other aspects of the project. I was both surprised and disappointed. I kept the friendship but let go of the work relationship after that  job. I’ve also worked as a consultant for several friends and treat them like I would any other client. Mutual respect and professionalism is key.

Do this instead: Again, talk about the rules of engagement early on to head off potential issues. Talk about your work styles, expectations, and any concerns. Be honest to avoid conflict later that could put a crimp in your personal relationship. So not worth it.

Bonus for both sides: Follow your gut

Intuition is highly underrated, especially when a consultant is hungry for new work and a client is starving for help. Both can lead to unappetizing results under the right (or rather wrong) circumstances. I liken it to overlooking flaws when dating someone and later those same negative qualities seemingly come out of nowhere—they were there from the beginning, of course, you just didn’t want to see them. My personal work hell in my first years of consulting was a similar life lesson: ridiculously high expectations, a crazy schedule, and poor communication skills made for a very unhappy work scenario. I told the client why the job wasn’t a good fit and that I wanted to end the contract. He, in turn, was livid, tried to convince me to stay, and then decided he wouldn’t pay me for the work I had completed. Sadly, I didn’t have the fortitude to fight for my money in those early days of my business. It was an expensive lesson but worth it. Always look  for the answer inside, whether you’re hiring someone or being hired (and oh yeah, dating too). Pay attention to that little voice, it really is telling you something.

Do this instead: The first time or two you talk as a potential client or consultant, if you get a bad feeling or fumble over communication every sentence, try and talk about it (tricky considering the situation) or get out gracefully—often it’s best bow out early instead of trying to make something work that could be a nightmare assignment for both of you.

The fact is, I learn work lessons from my clients every day—some that inspire me to do things differently, others that surprise me with epiphanies, and a few choice ones  I’ll never work with again but are good article material. Win-Win!